Monthly Archives: March 2016

college campus

Campus Safety

As a college student, you may be experiencing complete freedom for the first time in your life, and it may seem both exhilarating and overwhelming. You left your parents at home and now you are on your own (except when it comes to cash, of course). Nevertheless, no one can tell you what you can and cannot do, as probably you know everything already, correct? Unfortunately, statistics show otherwise.

Even though college campuses are regarded as a sort of safety bubble for students, crimes of different sorts continue happening. Crimes ranging from assaults, to burglaries to sex crimes have been reported on many campuses across the nation. While most of them are committed by residents (students) of the campus, almost 20% were committed by outsiders from the surrounding communities. No one expects anything like that to happen in the new life that you are about to start, but it is wise to keep a  few tips in mind to  assist you during times of need as you finish your studies on campus. As the old adage goes, “Better safe than sorry.”

Campus Is Not As Safe As Many Think

As much as you are used to listening to your mp3 player or Smartphone at all times, at least as a freshman, avoid this habit and try to become more aware of your surroundings. Watch and scan carefully for different people and scenarios in order to recognize a potentially dangerous situation in time to avoid it. College students come from many different places and backgrounds, so it is impossible to be quite sure if every single one of them has fully honest intentions. Walking alone at night has never been a good idea for any place in the world and college campus are not the exception. Always invite a trusted friend to join you on your night walks back to your dorm. Aside from experiencing potential danger outside, indoor crime can be serious as well, both for you and your possessions. Let locking the doors and closing the windows while you are asleep or out become a trustworthy habit. This can spare you from burglaries, assaults, or even sex crimes. Most campuses have specific emergency systems and emergency points; be informed on where they are located and how to access them. Furthermore, get to know your campus well. Walk around the campus frequently and get to know paths, shortcuts and hiding spots.

Additional Tips

Parties will probably be an avoidable part of your college life, and even though they are seemingly harmless, try attending with at least one friend that’s going to stick around with you. Don’t allow yourself to get too lost in all of the madness happening there. Taking self-defense or martial art classes can also be beneficial if you are ever in an unforeseen situation; even carrying a simple pepper spray can be advantageous. No one is 100% safe anytime, anywhere, so with this in mind be sure you have taken necessary precautions in case you encounter a precarious situation.

What safety measures does your campus have in place?  

confidence

Gaining Confidence After an Accident

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports the fifth most common cause of death in the U.S. is accidents, as also stated on Boston auto accident attorneys’ website. Most accidents are very traumatic, even where there was no physical injury. The emotional scars can remain for a really long time particularly if you were the one behind the wheel. You might find yourself reluctant to get anywhere near the wheel of a car soon after. This is a normal reaction and may not bother you much at first. However, it is important that this feeling does not linger. The best way to overcome the fear of driving after an accident is to get your confidence back. Here are a few suggestions on how to do just that.

Be Kind to Yourself

Don’t feel keep feeling bad about what happened. Stop blaming yourself because you had an accident. According to Forbes, most people file a claim for collision at least once in about 17 years. So you are not alone in this. Whether it was as a result of your mistake or the other driver’s, there are lessons; learn from them and move on. When you move on, go slowly. Do not push yourself too hard as you have been through an experience that would most likely be traumatic for most people. Take things easy and be kind to yourself. Take care of yourself and if you need to take driving lessons in order to boost your confidence, go ahead and take them.

Get Back On

Don’t wait too long before getting back behind the wheel or you might get paralyzed by anxiety. Go slowly, but do make proactive efforts to try and get back to driving. You can start in your neighbourhood where there is less traffic, and drive around for a bit. As your confidence builds, you can then move on to the highway and your other normal routes. If you do not want to stress about being responsible for someone else, then drive alone until you gain more confidence. However, if having the company of someone you trust helps you to keep calm, be sure to invite them along for the ride. Understand that everyone is different, so go with the approach that works for you.

Seek Therapy

Driving anxiety is a real problem for many people and if you are suffering from such anxiety, do not dismiss it. If you have tried driving again and you just can’t seem to make that move from thinking about it to actually driving, then you should seek therapy. Psychotherapy is used for anxiety resulting from a traumatic experience, and it is likely that the accident was traumatic for you. Do not let anyone make you feel bad about the need to seek psychotherapy, in the end it is about taking control of your life. If you are able to face your fears and get behind that wheel at the end of it all, then that’s all that should matter.

Gaining your confidence back after having a motor accident is not easy, but with patience and determination it can be done. Just remember to be kind to yourself and take it at your own pace.